Winter is coming at Revtangen

The Common Ringed Plover is a small plover. At Revtangen on Jaeren, south west Norway. (Photo Bjorn Grotting)

The Common Ringed Plover is a small plover. At Revtangen on Jaeren, south west Norway. (Photo Bjorn Grotting)

Winter is coming. At Revtangen bird observatory south of Stavanger that means time for action, but fortunately of a peaceful nature. Autumn is high season for bird ringing when it comes to migratory species like waders.

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Winter sunset

Norway, Stoksund. Winter colours. An ice and snow covered landscape at sunset. (Photo Bjorn Grotting)

Norway, Trondelag, Stokksund. Winter colours. An ice and snow covered landscape at sunset. (Photo Bjorn Grotting)

It’s always fun to look through old photos. I captured this scene more than ten years ago. It got me a price in a photo contest held by Trondheim’s largest newspaper. This was back in the “old” days, while film based cameras were more common than the digital wonders we use today. Most of us who shot film know the feeling; you think you have a nice shot, but will not know the result for several days, or weeks in worst case.

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A colourful meeting

Mandarin Duck in Mosvannet lake, Stavanger, Norway. The Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata), or just Mandarin, is a medium-sized perching duck, closely related to the North American Wood Duck. It is 41-49 cm long with a 65-75 cm wingspan. The adult male is a striking and unmistakable bird. The species was once widespread in eastern Asia, but the destruction of habitats have reduced the populations. Specimens frequently escape from collections, and may be seen as far north as Scandinavia. (Bjorn Grotting)

Mandarin Duck in Mosvannet lake, Stavanger, Norway. The Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata), or just Mandarin, is a medium-sized perching duck, closely related to the North American Wood Duck. It is 41-49 cm long with a 65-75 cm wingspan. The adult male is a striking and unmistakable bird. The species was once widespread in eastern Asia, but the destruction of habitats have reduced the populations. Specimens frequently escape from collections, and may be seen as far north as Scandinavia. (Photo Bjorn Grotting)

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